18 March 2013

Modern Conflicts - FUBAR in 1/72

Photos from a multiplayer game with 6 different players in an "Ambush Alley" style game using some very simple, fast and very effective rules called "FUBAR" -

http://thegamesshed.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/fubar-core-rules-4th-edition1.pdf

SCENARIO

In the midst of a war between various factions in an imaginary country, a squad of U.N. soldiers has been tasked with taking a ransom payment of 50 million dollars to a meeting point in the war-torn city.

On their journey to deliver the ransom money to the group that has the two allied pilots as hostages, they've stumbled into the middle of a battle between multiple rival factions fighting each other.

The U.N. VAB carrying the ransom money on its way to the drop-off point has been hit by an RPG fired by one of the warring factions and completely immobilized.

Apart from fighting each other, all the factions are targeting any foreign troops that cross their path or come into their field of view.

PLAYERS / MISSIONS

Player 1 - International UN troops stranded / wounded around the VAB. They have to find cover and fight off any attacks until rescued.

Player 2 - French Legionnaires under UN command - tasked with reaching the VAB and bring the UN troops back to safety.

Player 3 - US special forces with two armed local interpreters enter the city - their mission, to locate the detained pilots and get them out of there

Player 4 - A corrupt local government official has knowledge of the plan to pay the ransom and has  dispatched a group of mercenaries to head out and intercept the ransom payment and keep it for themselves.

Player 5 -  German special forces from the KSK have discovered the corrupt government official's plan and they have been sent to intercept the mercenaries.

Player 6 - Umpire and warring factions. The umpire has informed each player separately about their mission, none of them know the others' missions. He also controls the warring factions' actions and appearance on the table using dice generating random events, actions and numbers.

GAME PHOTOS

The disabled VAB burns in a small plaza. The UN troops bail out.



They scramble to find shelter in nearby buildings under heavy fire from all sides.



US troops enter the table accompanied by an armed interpreter.



KSK carry out a brief recon of the neighbourhood from a rooftop position on the edge of town. Intel tells them the mercenaries will be entering from this area.



Bloodthirsty mercenaries prepare to make their way to the plaza to try and get their hands on the booty.








Over on the other side of the neighbourhood, a small group of French Legionnaires make their way on foot through the backstreets.



All the time warring factions take potshots from the rooftops at each other and also at any foreign troops that move within their field of view.





As the mercenaries near the plaza, they find the road blocked by a large oil tanker lorry



They dismount and head out on foot



German KSK commandos swiftly reach the plaza, confer with the UN troops and quickly "rescue" the ransom money to exit town before the mercenaries even get there.



One turn later and the Legionnaires reach the disabled VAB, and together with the UN troops they make a fighting retreat, evacuating the stunned and wounded



The group finally makes it back to the outskirts of town and to safety.









The US troops also managed to locate the pilots and bring them back to safety (but no pictures unfortunately), while the mercenaries never reached the town centre and were practically wiped out by a large group of local militia who stumbled into them when the umpire revealed a random event card.

There was a lot of action during the game, a lot of firing and a lot of fun - and of course we always keep in mind that thankfully this is just a game with toy soldiers.

24 November 2012

20mm / 1:72 Sci-Fi / Near Future / Post-Apoc Conversions

Quick update on the Sci-Fi / Post-Apoc front.

A new painted "Control Trooper" sporting a riot helmet. He's accompanied by a Stryker from the "World Order" policing forces.

I've seen a lot of 15mm Sci-Fi figures on various blogs that have really inspired me into getting into the genre.

Unfortunately 15mm metals are out (maybe at least until I retire that is) as I've enough 1:72 plastic to sink a battleship. Besides which, my first love has always been plastic 20mm / 1:72 scale so I decided to try my hand at converting some figures from various modern-day sets to see how they turned out.

These are some of the first attempts and I'm quite pleased how they're coming along.





I've cut off the ends of the gun barrels - I think it makes them look like fairly reasonable future "blast" weapons.

18 November 2012

USAAF Figure Conversion

I finished these three figures off last night. Veteran plastic fans will recognize the body from the old Airfix USAAF set. The heads are from Esci figures.

One's for North Africa, and the other two for Europe



I did the head swaps about a year ago and they had been lying half-forgotten until I came across them yesterday and spent an evening painting and basing them.



27 September 2012

Smallscale (1/72, 1/76, 20mm) Polythene figure conversions

Smallscale (1/72, 1/76, 20mm) Polythene figure conversions

Polythene figure conversions ; simple replacements of helmets, heads, limbs, torsos & other body parts



There's a huge selection of small-scale plastic figure sets of all types on the market with wide and varied poses but in spite of that the need for some additional pose will always arise, and besides, we are modellers and can’t live without making some kind of modification to everything we lay our hands on.

Well need the following items :
Superglue
Dressmakers pins
Straight edged craft knife
Pin Drill
Strong Cutters / Pliers
Mouse pad (or some other similar cushioned base)
A handkerchief or similar


Before we embark on full-scale amputation, study the figures a little first to see where the cut can be made and how you might be able best join up with the new torso.

The beauty of using plastic figures is that if you make a mistake, they are cheap enough to replace.

Once youve decided where youll need to make the cuts, place the figure onto a cushioned surface which will absorb the cut of the knife and stop the figure from slipping I use the cushioned reverse side of an old mouse pad or thick cloth.

A very sharp flat blade hobby knife or scalpel is needed to make a clean cut in the plastic and I usually use the thin disposable types with little sections that can be broken off at intervals.



It’s handy to have a little dish or saucer around to put the heads, helmets, arms, etc., into so that they don’t end up on the floor as Ive spent a good deal of time crawling around looking for bits that have dropped and have disappeared forever.

Once you have the heads, helmets, limbs, etc., you will need to insert strengthening pins into them which serve as pegs to hold the these pieces onto the new body.

First start by sticking the pointed end of the pin into the head / helmet / limb, where it will be attached to the new body (taking care not to stick the pin into your finger)

Once this is done, take some strong pliers and cut the pin so as to leave a “peg” of about 2-3mm sticking out.

While you have the pliers gripping the pin, before you cut, put a handkerchief over the part of the pin that will be cut off and so youll catch the piece youve cut and it wont go whizzing over to the other side of the room.

This way youll avoid finding the other half of the pin it hard way later when you might suddenly find it stuck in your foot or somewhere worse.




We need to make a hole in the torso where it will be receiving the new body part. Do this with a pin drill, and make a generously sized hole so as to give us some room to play around with when we attach the new piece.

Now try the fit to see how it looks and make adjustments to the hole if necessary.



When you’re satisfied apply some superglue liberally to both surfaces. If you made a hole with quite a lot of room and the peg is able to move around a lot, that’s not really too much of a problem because the glue will seep into the extra space and give a firm hold.

If there happens to be a gaping space at the join, fill it with white glue on a small paintbrush, and keep adding more white glue if necessary until the join line is no longer visible.

Figures modified in this way can safely be used for wargaming as the joint is quite robust and under normal handling conditions they will be perfectly fine and the parts shouldnt separate.